Schools for Tomorrow Conference

If you have been on Twitter the last couple of days, you may have seen me working through whether/how I can get an “invitation” for, and then fund a trip to the New York Times Schools for Tomorrow Conference in September, themed “Virtual U: The Coming of Age of Online Education”.

Screen shot 2013-08-12 at 3.36.12 PM

Here’s why.

The list of questions on the agenda includes these:

  • IS ONLINE EDUCATION THE GREAT EQUALIZER?
  • HAS THE UNIVERSITY AS AN INSTITUTION HAD ITS DAY?
  • How do higher education institutions need to adapt their existing curriculum for online delivery?
  • WHAT’S THE NEW ERA BUSINESS MODEL FOR HIGHER EDUCATION?
  • HOW WILL ONLINE EDUCATION REVOLUTIONALIZE [sic] WHAT WE KNOW AND UNDERSTAND ABOUT LEARNING?

See, there are some powerful assumptions behind those questions. It is not at all clear to me that the audience will be stacked in ways that invite questioning those assumptions.

That’s where I come in.

What assumptions? you ask? A short list includes these:

  • That online education just needs to be done right in order to be the great equalizer, because…
  • Education is primarily about content delivery, in which…
  • The platform for this delivery is paramount.
  • That online delivery is among the more important reasons to change extant college and university curricula, and related to this…
  • That changes in response to online delivery models will generally result in “better” results.
  • That business models should be at the heart of our rethinking of higher education.
  • That online education will revolutionize what we know about teaching and learning.

Now, maybe some of those are true assumptions. I don’t know. But the general tone of things doesn’t suggest the house is going to be packed with people asking whether they are.

So let’s get Triangleman there, shall we?

Got some juice with the New York Times, Capella University or BlackBerry? I would be most obliged for any help you can provide getting an “invitation“. (Sorry…”invitation” is in quotes every time because: You apply for one, then once you receive it you buy a ticket to the conference. Ticket price? $800. If I had known that’s how invitations worked, I might have invited more people to my wedding!)

Got some spare change in your couch cushions? After I get the invitation, I have some creative ideas for crowdfunding this baby and bringing y’all along with me.

Oh…Did I mention the keynote speaker?

sal

Update

I’m in. Now to fund this thing…

Second update

I got some money from my Dean. And I am hawking a Kindle book—Talking Math with Your KidsGo buy a copy ($5 CHEAP!) and support the work!

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6 responses to “Schools for Tomorrow Conference

  1. Good luck on making it. You can apply for a “grant” and get a ticket for $495. I did some fundraising at my school to attend (only later to find out I have a conflict). I suggest asking your school or company for a sponsorship. I was appalled to see the lack of public educators involved. Also, after reading your blog I am thinking that you would have some tremendous input for them. So I hope you find a way there. I teach in NY and would be happy to meet and talk math anytime.

  2. You are so far reaching plus your ideas and purpose are commendable so why not add a pay pal button for donations on your blog? I’d kick in.
    I haven’t checked it out but I’d bet the conference is connected to ALEC.

  3. Pingback: Further progress | Overthinking my teaching

  4. Pingback: Talking Math with Your Kids for Kindle! | Overthinking my teaching

  5. Pingback: Instructional creativity [#NYTEdTech] | Overthinking my teaching

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