Wiggins question #4

Question 4

Place these numbers in order of largest to smallest: .00156, 1/60, .0015, .001, .002

One sixtieth is the biggest of these, as the others are between one and two one-thousandths (or between one one-thousandth and one five-hundredth).

Then, in descending order, we have .002, .00156, .0015 and .001.

It is common that students will order the decimals this way:

.00156, .0015, .002, .001

I cannot predict where a person who does this will place one sixtieth.

Nonetheless, when we read these decimals as point zero zero one five six, we encourage students to ignore place value, and we encourage the misapplication of whole-number rules to the right of the decimal point.

We really do need to use place value language for decimals in classrooms. One-hundred-fifty-six one-hundred-thousandths.

Much, much more about this and related ideas in the Triangleman Decimal Institute posts from last fall. Short version: learning decimals is WAY more complicated than most people have any reason to imagine.

About these ads

One response to “Wiggins question #4

  1. carloliwitter

    I think the use of the appropriate decimal language gets lost quickly, at least in my classroom, and I assume in the middle and high schools where my students arrive from. Thanks for that.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s